Joan Stoykovich Nelson

Oklahoma Conservative Political Action Committee
George W. Bush Presidential Center
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Tulsa Republican Club
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Video Thought To Be Earliest Footage of Shanksville, PA Crash Scene

Nearly 10 years after September 11th, a woman who’s collecting oral histories of the crash of Flight 93 believes to have found the earliest video showing the crash of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

The footage was recorded just minutes after the crash by Dave Berkebile, who’s narrating over the video as he’s recording it. United Flight 93 held 40 passengers and hit the ground at more than 500 miles per hour.

 
PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH
 

 Amid Mud, Security Flight 93 Dedication Begins

SHANKSVILLE, Pa. — A somber ceremony honoring the heroism of the 40 passengers and crew aboard Flight 93 on Sept. 11 has begun.

Vice President Joe Biden and former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, along with relatives of the passengers and crew, were attending Saturday under gray skies in a field soggy from rain all week in rural Pennsylvania.

Speakers at the dedication of the first phase of the $62 million Flight 93 National Memorial also include Gordon Felt, president of Families of Flight 93. His brother Edward telephoned a friend to report the flight was being hijacked.

Sarah McLachlan was also set to sing during the ceremony before Biden unveils a wall with the names of those aboard the plane.

Muddy fields that complicated parking and heavy security delayed the start of the ceremony.

    © Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 

Fmr. President George W. Bush

Salutes Sacrifice of 9/11 Victims

 

 

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Picture of the temporary overlook site of satellite trucks and news crews setting up for live reports this weekend.

Flight 93 Memorial Presser

 The temporary memorial that brings in over 150,000 visitors a year closed it’s doors today on the eve of the permanent memorial’s dedication.

 
Visitors Gather at Dedication Thousands of visitors came to see the official dedication of the Flight 93 National Memorial on the eve of the September 11th anniversary.

 Flight 93 National Memorial Site

Headstone for Those Lost
 

 Walking Through the Field Where the Plane Crashed

 

 Wall of Names

 Madeline Leans her Great Uncle's Name

The Inscription of a Victim's Name
 

 The Wall of Names

FMR. PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH

Fmr. President George W. Bush

Dedication of  Flight 93

National Memorial  Shanksville, PA

Mr. Secretary, thank you very much. Mr. Vice President, Dr. Biden, President Clinton, Mr. Speaker, Members of Congress. My friends Tommy Franks and Tom Ridge, thank you for helping raise the money for this memorial. Members of the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation, and all those who supported this memorial — but most importantly the families of Flight 93 — Laura and I are honored to join you in dedicating this memorial to the heroes of Flight 93.

When the sun rose in the Pennsylvania sky ten years ago tomorrow, it was a peaceful September morning. By the time it set, nearly 3,000 people were gone — the most lives lost on American soil in a single day since the Battle of Antietam.

With the distance of a decade, 9/11 can feel like part of a different era. But for the families of the men and women stolen, some of whom have joined us today, that day will never feel like history. The memory of that morning is fresh, and so is the pain. America shares your grief. We pray for your comfort. And we honor your loved ones.

On September 11, 2001, innocent men and women went to work at the World Trade Center, reported for duty at the Pentagon, and boarded American Flights 11 and 77, and United Flights 93 and 175. They did nothing to provoke or deserve the deliberate act of murder that Al Qaeda carried out.

One of the lessons of 9/11 is that evil is real, and so is courage. When the planes struck the World Trade Center, firefighters and police officers charged up the stairs, into the flames. As the towers neared collapse, they continued the rescue. Ultimately, more than 400 police officers and firefighters gave their lives. Among them was the chief of the New York City Fire Department, Pete Ganci. As a colleague put it, “He would never ask anyone to do something he didn’t do himself.”

At the Pentagon, service members and civilians pulled friends and strangers from burning rubble. One Special Forces soldier recalls “reaching through a cloud of smoke” in search of the wounded. As he entered one room, he prayed to find someone alive. He discovered a severely burned woman and carried her to safety. They later met in the hospital, where she explained that she had been praying for rescue. She called him her “guardian angel.”

Then there is the extraordinary story we commemorate here. Aboard United Airlines Flight 93 were college students from California, an iron worker from New Jersey, veterans of the Korean War and World War Two, citizens of Germany and Japan, and a pilot who had rearranged his schedule so that he could take his wife on vacation to celebrate their anniversary. When the passengers and crew realized the plane had been hijacked, they reported the news calmly. When they learned that terrorists had crashed other planes into targets on the ground, they accepted greater responsibilities. In the back of the cabin, the passengers gathered to devise a strategy. At the moment America’s democracy was under attack, our citizens defied their captors by holding a vote. The choice they made would cost them their lives. And they knew it.

Many passengers called their loved ones to say goodbye, then hung up to perform their final act. One said, “They’re getting ready to break into the cockpit. I have to go. I love you.” Another said, “It’s up to us. I think we can do it.” In one of the most stirring accounts, Todd Beamer, a father of two with a pregnant wife at home in New Jersey, asked the air phone operator to join him in reciting the Lord’s Prayer. Then he helped lead the charge to the front of the plane with two words: “Let’s Roll.” With their selfless act, the men and women who stormed the cockpit lived out the words, “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

And with their brave decision, they launched the first counteroffensive of the war on terror. The most likely target of the hijacked plane was the United States Capitol. We will never know how many innocent people might have been lost. But we do know this: Americans are alive today because the passengers and crew of Flight 93 chose to act, and this Nation will be forever grateful.

The 40 souls who perished with the plane left a great deal behind. They left spouses, children, and grandchildren who miss them dearly. They left successful businesses, promising careers, and a lifetime of dreams that they will never have the chance to fulfill. And they left something else: a legacy of bravery and selflessness that will always inspire America. For generations, people will study the story of Flight 93. They will learn that individual choices make a difference, that love and sacrifice can triumph over evil and hate, and that what happened above this Pennsylvania field ranks among the most courageous acts in American history.

The memorial we dedicate today will ensure that our nation always remembers those lost here on 9/11 . But we have a duty beyond memory. We have a duty beyond honoring. We have a duty to live our lives in a way that upholds the ideals for which the men and women gave their lives – to build a living memorial to their courage and sacrifice.

First, we have a duty to find common purpose as a nation. In the days after 9/11, the response came like a single hand over a single heart. Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle gathered on the steps outside the Capitol and sang, “God Bless America.” Neighbors reached out to neighbors of all backgrounds and beliefs. In the past decade, our country has been tested – by natural disaster, economic turmoil, and anxieties about challenges at home and abroad. There have been spirited debates along the way. That is the essence of democracy. But Americans have never been defined by our disagreements. Whatever challenges we face today and in the future, we must never lose faith in our ability to meet them together. And we must never allow our differences to harden into divisions.

Second, we have a duty to remain engaged in the world. 9/11 proved that the conditions in a country on the other side of the world can have an impact on our own streets. It may be tempting to think that it does not matter what happens to a villager in Afghanistan or a child in Africa. But the temptation of isolation is deadly wrong. A world of oppression and anger and resentment will be a source of never-ending violence and threats. A world of dignity and liberty and hope will be safer and better for all. And the surest way to move toward that vision is for the United States of America to lead the cause of freedom.

Finally, we each have a duty to serve a cause larger than ourselves. The passengers aboard Flight 93 set an example that inspires us all. Many have followed their path of service by donating blood, mentoring a child, or volunteering in desperate corners of the Earth. Some have devoted their careers to analyzing intelligence, protecting our borders, or securing our skies. Others have made the noble choice to defend our nation in battle. For ten years, our troops have risked and given their lives to prevent our enemies from attacking America again. They have kept us safe, they have made us proud, and they have upheld the spirit of service shown by the passengers of Flight 93.

Many years ago in 1863, another President came to dedicate a memorial site in this state. He told his audience that “in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground,” for the brave souls who struggled there had “consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract.” He added that “the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

So it is with Flight 93. For as long as this memorial stands, we will remember what the men and women aboard that plane did here. We will pay tribute to the courage they showed, the sacrifice they made, and the lives they spared. And the United States of America will never forget.

 

Courage of Flight 93 Victims Lauded at Dedication of Memorial

SHANKSVILLE, Pennsylvania (AP) — The 40 passengers and crew who fought back against their hijackers aboard Flight 93 on Sept. 11 performed one of the most courageous acts in U.S. history, former President George W. Bush said Saturday at a ceremony dedicating the first phase of a memorial at the newest U.S. national park.

The hijackers intended to crash the plane in Washington but “never made it because of the determination and valor of the passengers and crew of Flight 93, that plane crashed in this field, less than 20 minutes by air” from the target, said Jon Jarvis, director of the National Park Service.

Because of their efforts, the terrorists were denied their quarry, he said.

Bush also pointed to what he called a shining example of democracy in action, referring to the group’s decision to hold a vote to decide to try to overpower the hijackers.

Gordon Felt front left, President of Families of Flight 93 whose brother Edward was a passenger on Flight 93, walks alongside Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar as Speaker of the House John Boehner, former President Bill Clinton and former President George W. Bush walk behind as they walk to the stage at the dedication of phase 1 of the permanent Flight 93 National Memorial near the crash site of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa., Saturday Sept. 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
 
Gordon Felt front left, President of Families of Flight 93 whose brother Edward was a passenger on Flight 93, walks alongside Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar as Speaker of the House John Boehner, former President Bill Clinton and former President George W. Bush walk behind as they walk to the stage at the dedication of phase 1 of the permanent Flight 93 National Memorial near the crash site of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa., Saturday Sept. 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

The Rev. Daniel Coughlin, who was the U.S. House Chaplain at the time of the attacks, called the sacrifices made by the passengers and crew “willing seed for freedom’s harvest.”

“They refused to be paralyzed. … They break the silence and decidedly act together. They do only what is possible in an impossible situation,” he said in the invocation. “Because they are your children, they find within themselves, true freedoms.”

Coughlin’ s invocation was followed by a long moment of silence as the U.S. flag was brought in, then a singing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The names of the victims were also read as bells tolled.

Poet Robert Pinsky took to the lectern and read a pair of poems, one about “needing to remember, even if you don’t want to,” and a second about heroism. The poems came from Brazilian Carlos Drummond de Andrade and Poland’s Czeslaw Milosz.

During the ceremony, former President Bill Clinton announced that he and U.S. House Speaker John Boehner will mount a bipartisan effort to raise the remaining $10 million needed to completely fund the Flight 93 National Memorial. Clinton also praised those aboard the plane as heroes who made the ultimate sacrifice.

The dedication of the Flight 93 National Memorial drew more than 4,000 people, including hundreds of victims’ relatives, to the rural Pennsylvania field where the hijacked plane crashed nearly 10 years ago.

Crowds getting there were slowed by weather-related traffic jams, muddy conditions and security rules but remained undeterred ahead of the ceremony.

Among those who came for the ceremony near Shanksville was Butch Stevens, 69, of Carlyle, Illinois, who stopped on his way back from a visit to Washington, D.C.

Stevens said he had no connection to anyone aboard the flight, except, as he said, as an American.

“This kind of makes you realize where you live,” Stevens said of the bravery of those who died aboard the plane.

The Rev. Daniel Coughlin, who was the U.S. House Chaplain at the time of the attacks, called the sacrifices made by the passengers and crew “willing seed for freedom’s harvest.”

“They refused to be paralyzed. … They break the silence and decidedly act together. They do only what is possible in an impossible situation,” he said in the invocation. “Because they are your children, they find within themselves, true freedoms.”

The dedication was the day’s most prominent Sept. 11 observance among many throughout the country. In New York City, hundreds of families, friends and strangers ringing lower Manhattan clasped hands as a bell clanged at 8:46 a.m. to signify the time the first hijacked plane crashed into the World Trade Center’s North Tower. It was one of several public and private events scheduled around the city, including a free performance by the New York Philharmonic and a memorial by Fire Department of New York for its 343 members who died on 9/11 and those who have died from illness after working at ground zero.

In Pennsylvania on Friday, family members of those who died on Flight 93 visited the crash site, read the guestbook and viewed the many mementos left by people from all over the world who have come to pay their respects.

Relatives shed some tears, but they also celebrated the spirit of the guestbook — a rare feeling that people from vastly different walks of life had come together.

“I don’t focus on what happened. You can’t change that,” said Lorne Lyles, whose wife, CeeCee Ross Lyles, had been working as a United Airlines flight attendant for only nine months on that September morning in 2001.

“Coming here is more of a celebratory thing. She’s been memorialized,” Lyles said. “Just to see the outpouring from all over the world is touching. You really do have some caring people in the world.”

Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar spoke at the site Friday. He noted that for all the progress on the memorial, there’s still work to be done. When it’s finished, it will include a “Tower of Voices” with 40 wind chimes.

Public and private donors have contributed $52 million, but $10 million more is needed to build a true visitors center and to finish landscaping, Salazar said.

The Washington Times Online Edition

In U.S., Somber Funeral

For Remains From Flight 93

A bell is rung during the reading of the names of passengers and crew who died on Flight 93 during memorial services near the crash site of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa., on Sept. 11, 2011. (Associated Press/Gene J. Puskar)
A bell is rung during the reading of the names of passengers and crew who died on Flight 93 during memorial services near the crash site of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa., on Sept. 11, 2011. (Associated Press/Gene J. Puskar)
 

SHANKSVILLE, Pa. — The remains of those killed aboard Flight 93 in rural Pennsylvania were buried Monday in a private ceremony for family members of the 40 passengers and crew, who were joined by those who responded to the scene on Sept. 11, 2001.

Nearly 500 family members, along with police, fire and emergency workers took part in the private interment at the Flight 93 National Memorial. The park was closed to the public to give them privacy.

A rabbi, a Buddhist sensei, a Catholic priest and a Lutheran minister officiated as the remains, kept in three caskets in a crypt for nearly 10 years, were placed to rest after being looked after by Somerset County Coroner Wallace Miller.

Carole O'Hare, whose mother Hilda Marcin was traveling to California to live with her daughter, said the ceremony brought some peace.

“There’s definitely peace of mind. I was always concerned about what would happen with the unidentified remains,” O’Hare told the Associated Press. “And now my feeling is they’re at peace and where they are meant to be.”

After the religious leaders spoke, the Somerset County Honor Guard played taps, and the American flags on each of the three dark brown caskets were folded and given to those in attendance.

Family members and mourners placed flowers on the caskets. The ceremony took place at what’s called the Sacred Ground site in the field at the national park.

Jerry Bingham, the father of victim Mark Bingham, said the service was “done just right.”

He thanked Miller for taking care of the unidentified remains and for all his work with the family members.

“He’s just a fantastic man. We’re just glad that Wally Miller was here. He took care of us families and took us under his wing. We’re very fortunate,” Bingham told AP.

 

  FRM. PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH 

DEDICATION FLIGHT 93 CLICK
 

 DEDICATION OF FLIGHT 93

CLICK FOR VIDEO

Jim Schweizer straightens flowers at the grave of Thomas Burnett on Monday at Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Bloomington, Minn.

Burnett was one of the nearly 3,000 people who died on Sept, 11, 2001.

He and 39 other passengers and crew were flying to San Francisco from Newark, N.J., on Flight 93 when the airplane was hijacked.

A few passengers and flight crew members courageously fought the hijackers to retake control of the plane. It is believed that the hijackers were aiming to redirect the airplane toward Washington to target either the Capitol Building or the White House.

The plane crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pa., killing everyone on board.

--Written by Theresa McCabe in Boston.