Joan Stoykovich Nelson

Oklahoma Conservative Political Action Committee
George W. Bush Presidential Center
Republican National Committee
American Legion Auxiliary
Fox News Contributor
Tulsa Republican Club
Heritage Foundation
John Birch Society
Freedom Alliance

Jeb Bush and his brother

 Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) knows it's coming, and when voters ask him to name ways in which he differs from his brother or father, he doesn't back down. On Friday, he told someone who asked this in New Hampshire that it wasn't a relevant comparison because 2015 isn't 2000 or 1988. He remains polite throughout: "getting into the differences with previous presidents, I don't think is particularly relevant."

 No matter what you think of Bush, and his president-relatives, he is clearly a decent man if he refuses to throw his brother under the bus. It is clear from his comments about his dad that he reveres President George H.W. Bush, and his less-popular brother is the constant subject from skeptics on the campaign trail, but Jeb has never dumped on W. George W. Bush even acknowledged this week that Jeb's problem is him, the 43rd president himself. But for W. to say that is one thing — Jeb would be a different person if he criticized his own family.

After a sustained period of ferocious fundraising and "frontrunner" status, Jeb Bush is struggling to take off. He knows it. Joking on Friday that he isn't expecting a coronation — in a likely reference to his protege Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) entering the race — Bush said: "I'm really intimidating a whole bunch of folks, aren't I?" Bush appears quite humble, and is clearly reading polls that show he is actually not leading the pack in support, though he is in dollars.

"I will have to earn it. No one's going to give it to me," Bush concluded. Because of his brother, earning it may be quite difficult. And in his refusal to overtly distance himself from his brother, it may be harder for him than anyone in the field. Doing the right thing may not help his race, but it is still the right thing.

http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/presidential-campaign/239345-jeb-bush-and-his-brother

Bush 41 asks donors to pony up for Jeb Bush for President 2016

Former President George H.W. Bush is sending a letter to potential donors asking them to give to the super-PAC that supports his son, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, ahead of a potential bid for president in 2016. 

“Your support of $250, $100, $50 or even $25 to the Right to Rise Super PAC is critical to show Jeb that there will be resources necessary to support him if he decides to run for President,” Bush writes in a letter

 “Jeb is the right man for the challenges ahead.”

The letter praises Bush for cutting taxes, vetoing earmarks, reducing the size of the state government and creating jobs while he served as governor of Florida.

“He is a tested and gracious leader who deeply believes that we must elevate our national debate and can also be counted on to be steadfast in defending our great nation.”

While Barbara Bush, President George H. W. Bush’s wife, cast doubt on whether Jeb should run last year, the entire Bush family has more recently coalesced around his likely campaign.

The parents will join their son at a fundraiser in Houston on Thursday, according to Bloomberg. And The Dallas Morning News previously reported that Jeb’s brother, George W. Bush, attended a Dallas fundraiser on Wednesday with his wife, Laura.

 http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/237118-president-george-hw-bush-asks-donors-to-pony-up-for-jeb

 

Former Texas senator picks Jeb over

Cruz for 2016

Former Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) is endorsing former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) for president over her fellow Texan Sen. Ted Cruz (R).

“I have met with him and I think he is exactly what we need right now that will take us in the right direction,” she said Wednesday about Bush on MSNBC’s “Now with Alex Wagner.”

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“I think he will have a vision and I think he will implement the vision because he's been a governor, he's run things. He knows business, and I think he will help our economy.”

Hutchison said that Bush is “not a Texan,” despite being born in Texas and earning a graduate degree from the University of Texas. Bush’s family is a Texas political dynasty, thanks to Presidents George H.W. and George W. Bush. The latter also served as the state's governor, and Jeb’s son, George P.  Bush, is the state’s land commissioner.

But even though she doesn’t view him as a Texan, the former senator praised Bush for his work as Florida governor and as the right choice in the 2016 presidential race. She called him the “trusted father type that you want to run our country." 

“Well I think he has a way about him that is going to give people confidence and I think people are going to trust him,” she said.

“He will have creative ideas to get to the things that we need, which are low unemployment and more people working in good jobs and families being able to support the children.”

Hutchison’s endorsement isn’t a surprise after news outlets reported earlier this week that she is slated to attend a Bush fundraiser in Dallas this week. But the declaration snubs Cruz, who replaced Hutchison when she retired from the Senate in 2012.

Cruz became the first to officially announce a bid for president earlier this week. While Bush is widely expected to run, he is still publicly weighing his options.

 http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/236967-former-texas-senator-picks-jeb-over-cruz-for-2016

  Photo by: Pat Sullivan
 In this April 29,2015 file photo, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks in Houston. He spoke in a language most Republican presidential primary voters do not understand. “You are part of the new wave of hope for this country,” Jeb Bush said in fluent Spanish to the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference this week. Switching to English, he said the U.S. needs immigrants for the country “to become young and dynamic again.”

Perfect primary pitch

Jeb Bush would like to watch

baseball with Teddy Roosevelt — and Pitbull

Boehner Aide Joining Jeb Bush PAC

Ahead of Expected White House Run

 A longtime top aide to Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) is heading south to Miami to join Jeb Bush’s political action committee ahead of the former Florida GOP governor’s expected run for the White House.

Michael Steel, a familiar face on Capitol Hill who has served as Boehner’s press secretary since 2008, will assume a “leadership role in policy and communications” with Right to Rise Policy Solutions PAC, Bush’s political action committee, which is focused on policy issues, sources confirmed. 

“Ask anyone in the Capitol — Republican, Democrat, or otherwise — about Michael Steel, and they will tell you the same thing: he is a pro’s pro,” Boehner said in a statement Monday.

“For more than seven years, I have relied on his ability to dissect an issue, win a debate, and deal openly and honestly with the press. He brings nothing but class, decency — and even cheer — to his work no matter how tough the situation,” the Speaker continued. “We would not be where we are today without him.”

Politico was first to report the move. Steel is expected to leave Boehner’s office by the end of the month.

Boehner hasn’t endorsed anyone in the GOP presidential primary, but he’s spent the past year encouraging Bush to enter the race. Steel will provide a direct line between Boehnerland and Bush’s all-but-certain presidential campaign.

Steel is no stranger to the campaign trail.

In 2012, he served as press secretary for Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) when Mitt Romney picked him as his running mate. And last year, Steel headed down to North Carolina to help Republican Thom Tillis unseat Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan.

 http://thehill.com/homenews/house/241615-boehner-aide-joining-bush-pac-ahead-of-expected-2016-run

 Bush: Religious freedom a choice between 'Little Sisters and Big Brother'

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said Saturday freedom of faith was a choice between the laws of man and the laws of God.
 
“From the standpoint of religious freedom, you might say it’s a choice between the Little Sisters and Big Brother,” Bush said at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va.
 
“I’m going with the Little Sisters,” he added, throwing in his support for the Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catholic religious institution for women which has clashed with the government over healthcare requirements in the past.

 Bush, a likely 2016 GOP presidential candidate, spoke as Liberty University’s commencement speaker. He charged Saturday that government sought to control matters of the spirit much like they did matters on Earth.

 
“Somebody here is being small-minded and intolerant,” Bush said of the battle between church and state.
 
"It sure isn’t the nuns, ministers and preachers who are practicing their faith,” he added.
 
Bush said secularism had pigeon-holed religion as old-fashioned and stale. This description, he argued, was a falsehood.
 
“How strange it is in our time to hear of Christianity spoken of as a backwards or oppressive force,” Bush said.
 
“It is an unfair criticism,” he added. “It is not only untrue, but a little ungrateful, to dismiss the Christian faith as an obstacle to progressive thought.”
 
“It strikes me that most of the criticism of our faith today is drawn from hostile characterization,” Bush said.
 
Bush urged Liberty University’s 2015 graduates to live actively in their faith upon leaving campus. Their spirituality, he said, was sorely needed amid the failures of the secular world.
 
“So much has been tried and the need is still so vast,” he said.
 
“We can take it as a personal challenge to live the most dynamic and joyous news to ever enter into this world,” Bush said of Christianity.
 
“No place that the message reaches, no heart that it touches, is ever the same again,” he added.
 
Bush has not yet made his 2016 decision public. Should he run, he would seek the same office once held by his brother, former President George W. Bush, and his father, former President George H.W. Bush.

 http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/241539-bush-religious-freedom-a-choice-between-little-sisters-and-big

 

Jeb Bush has brought on a former top political adviser to Mitt Romney to serve as a senior political strategist and possibly the role of his eventual campaign manager.

The New York Times reported on Thursday that well-renowned Iowa-based Republican strategist David Kochel has joined the growing team of political operatives running Bush’s newly formed PAC, Right to Rise.

Kochel, who led Romney's 2008 and 2012 bids in the state, will relocate from Iowa to Miami to join Bush’s growing team, according to the New York Times report.

 The hire isn’t just a clear signal that Bush is gearing up for a presidential run. It’s also a shot at Romney, the 2012 GOP nominee, who is gearing up for a third-consecutive presidential run.  

Bush and Romney will be competing for many of the same donors and top-level political operatives, and recent reports are that Bush is winning that early battle. The Associated Press reported on Thursday that many of Romney’s 2012 donors have already committed to the Bush camp. 

Kochel’s hiring comes during a busy week for Bush’s PAC.

The Miami Herald reported on Thursday that the nucleus of what will likely be Bush’s campaign team has assembled in Tallahassee, Fla to launch the PAC.

The Herald reports that Sally Bradshaw, Bush’s top political adviser and a Tallahassee resident, will head the political action committee. 

Two Washington-based Bush operatives, Kristy Campbell and Matt Gorman, both moved from the nation’s capital to the Florida capital earlier this month, according to the report. Campbell is Bush’s spokeswoman, and Gorman, formerly the rapid-response director for the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2014, will likely play a similar role.

The team also includes Jesse Hunt, who was a communications director for former Sen. Scott Brown’s campaign in New Hampshire; Josh Venable, a former finance director for the Republican National Committee; Karen Unger, a campaign manager for Bush’s 2002 reelection effort; Brandi Brown, a director at Bush’s Foundation for Excellence in Education; and Pablo Diaz, a Florida lobbyist and businessman.

Bush launched the Right to Rise PAC earlier this month. PACs can’t legally coordinate with candidates, but Bush hasn’t formally entered the race yet, and some on the team would likely leave the PAC to join the official campaign if Bush decides to run.

 http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/presidential-races/231181-bushs-political-team-takes-shape

Jeb Bush previews 2016 run, promising ‘adult conversations’ on big issues

Jeb Bush previewed the ideas at the heart of his likely presidential campaign, delivering a sweeping address here Friday about the economy, foreign affairs and energy exploration, and challenging the country to question “every aspect of how government works.”

In his first major speech since stepping into the 2016 presidential sweepstakes in December, the Republican former Florida governor spoke confidently and in significant detail about the broad range of issues beginning to shape the campaign for the White House. Bush signaled he would offer the country the “adult conversations” he said are lacking in Washington and would focus on people who have been left out of the economic revival.

“Sixty percent of Americans believe that we’re still in a recession,” Bush said. “They’re not dumb. It’s because they are in a recession. They’re frustrated, and they see a small portion of the population on the economy’s up escalator. Portfolios are strong, but paychecks are weak. Millions of Americans want to move forward in their lives — they want to rise — but they’re losing hope.”

Bush was sharply critical of Washington — not only of President Obama but also of the Republican-controlled Congress — saying there were too many “academic and political hacks” with “hard-core ideology” who are running the country without making progress.

“They’re basically Maytag repairmen,” he said. “Nothing gets done.” Bush added, “It is time to challenge every aspect of how government works — how it taxes, how it regulates, how it spends — to open up economic opportunity for all.”

Bush delivered Friday’s keynote address to the National Automobile Dealers Association’s annual convention in San Francisco, one of his final paid speaking appearances before he turns his attention fully to the 2016 campaign.

Bush — who has been on an ambitious, national tour to raise money for Right to Rise PAC, his leadership political action committee — was careful to say he was only “seriously considering the possibility of running.” He told the crowd of 4,000 auto dealers and industry executives, “Your checkbook, by the way, is very safe here.”

Former Florida governor Jeb Bush speaks at the 2015 National Auto Dealers Association conference Jan. 23 in San Francisco. 

Jeb Bush previewed the ideas at the heart of his likely presidential campaign, delivering a sweeping address here Friday about the economy, foreign affairs and energy exploration, and challenging the country to question “every aspect of how government works.”

In his first major speech since stepping into the 2016 presidential sweepstakes in December, the Republican former Florida governor spoke confidently and in significant detail about the broad range of issues beginning to shape the campaign for the White House. Bush signaled he would offer the country the “adult conversations” he said are lacking in Washington and would focus on people who have been left out of the economic revival.

“Sixty percent of Americans believe that we’re still in a recession,” Bush said. “They’re not dumb. It’s because they are in a recession. They’re frustrated, and they see a small portion of the population on the economy’s up escalator. Portfolios are strong, but paychecks are weak. Millions of Americans want to move forward in their lives — they want to rise — but they’re losing hope.”

Bush was sharply critical of Washington — not only of President Obama but also of the Republican-controlled Congress — saying there were too many “academic and political hacks” with “hard-core ideology” who are running the country without making progress.

“They’re basically Maytag repairmen,” he said. “Nothing gets done.” Bush added, “It is time to challenge every aspect of how government works — how it taxes, how it regulates, how it spends — to open up economic opportunity for all.”

Bush delivered Friday’s keynote address to the National Automobile Dealers Association’s annual convention in San Francisco, one of his final paid speaking appearances before he turns his attention fully to the 2016 campaign.

Bush — who has been on an ambitious, national tour to raise money for Right to Rise PAC, his leadership political action committee — was careful to say he was only “seriously considering the possibility of running.” He told the crowd of 4,000 auto dealers and industry executives, “Your checkbook, by the way, is very safe here.”

But Bush used the opportunity to signal the kind of campaign he intends to run. His message contrasted starkly with the rhetoric expected from some other hopefuls who are gathering in Iowa this weekend for a political festival hosted by Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), an anti-immigration reform firebrand.

Bush drew loud and sustained applause when he called for immigration reform that would provide a path to legalized status for undocumented immigrants living in the United States.

“We have a history of allowing people to come in legally to embrace our values and pursue their dreams in a way that creates prosperity for all of us,” Bush said. “No country can do this like America. Our national identity is not based on race or some kind of exclusionary belief. Historically, the unwritten contract has been, come legally to our country, embrace our values, learn English, work and you can be as American as anyone else.”

In an subtle swipe at other GOP leaders and potential rivals who rally the conservative base with hot tirades about Obama’s overreach, Bush said the Republican Party will win back the White House only if it offers an optimistic message. “Hope and a positive agenda wins out over anger and reaction every day of the week,” he said.

Bush’s called for simplification of the tax code, including lowering rates and “eliminating as many loopholes as possible.” He also called for more energy exploration. Approving construction of the Keystone XL pipeline was “a no-brainer,” he said, as is support for horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracking.

“It’s not cool here in San Francisco to talk about this,” he joked. But, “It’s cool in places like North Dakota and West Texas and South Texas. It’s cool because it creates significant economic activity.”

In his appearance here, Bush did not shy away from his place in a dynastic political family. The bio video that played before he spoke was heavy on references to his father, former president George H.W. Bush, and brother, former president George W. Bush. Jeb Bush cited both in his remarks, saying his dad was a model for leadership, especially on foreign policy, and noting that his brother had become a rather fine painter. “Who would’ve thunk it?” he said.

Bush is not alone among likely 2016 presidential candidates on the paid speaking circuit. Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton has been delivering speeches and making other appearances for pay since stepping down as secretary of state in 2013.

Clinton was a keynote speaker at last year’s auto dealers convention, in New Orleans, where she disclosed that she had not driven a car in nearly 20 years. “The last time I actually drove a car myself was 1996,” she said. Jokingly, she added: “I remember it very well. Unfortunately, so does the Secret Service, which is why I haven’t driven since then.”

Bush made an indirect reference to Clinton’s remark. During the question-and-answer session, when the association’s chairman asked Bush his favorite

kind of car, Bush said he just bought a Ford Fusion. “For the record, I do drive,” he said, adding that he plans to return to the dealership for a two-hour tutorial on the Fusion’s technology.

Bush was asked about his Thursday meeting in Utah with Mitt Romney, the 2012 GOP presidential nominee who also is exploring a 2016 run. The two men, each a favorite of the party establishment, are on a collision course, but Bush said they mostly avoided talk about the campaign.

“We talked about the Patriots,” Bush said. “We talked a little bit about politics, not as much as you might imagine. We talked about the future of the country. We talked about the need for a more engaged foreign policy.. . .The awkward side of this, about running and such, we put aside.”

Answering questions on stage, Bush opened a window on his personal life. He said he loves Sundays — “It’s Sunday fun day” — because he doesn’t work. “I play golf really fast so I can have breakfast really fast so I can go to Mass slower — can’t ask the priest to accelerate that. I probably would if I could.”

He called himself “an introvert,” saying he would “rather read a book than go out and get in a conga line.”

“Introverts actually are grinders,” Bush said. “They identify a problem by and large, and then they overcome it. But I learned that in order to make your case or in order to serve or in order to advance a cause, you have to connect with people, and you can’t connect with people if you’re back in the corner reading a book.”

 http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/jeb-bush-previews-2016-run-promising-adult-conversations-on-big-issues/2015/01/23/783d3e86-a315-11e4-b146-577832eafcb4_story.html

Jeb Bush: I Wouldn't Immediately Repeal Obama's Immigration Action

 

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush waves while being introduced on Friday, Jan. 23, 2015.

Jeb Bush Is His Own Man — And Most of His Competition — on Foreign Policy

 The U.S. “no longer inspires fear in our enemies” says Jeb Bush, painting Obama as indecisive, but saying little about what he’d do differently.

Jeb Bush delivered the inevitable “I am my own man” line in his first major foreign policy speech as a pre-presidential candidate on Wednesday. But the former Florida governor did little to say exactly how he would lead the U.S. differently than his presidential father or brother. Perhaps more important, Bush’s stated foreign policy platform does little to differentiate himself from the rest of the GOP field of candidates, or President Barack Obama.

That could prove troublesome for the perceived front-runner in a campaign where national security and American leadership in global conflicts is expected to remain a central theme. While Bush repeated many of the Republican talking-point criticisms of Obama’s leadership as being too slow or soft from the Islamic State to Russia and Iran, what positions Bush did lay out – especially regarding military intervention in the Middle East – sounded nearly identical to what the Obama administration already is doing.    

“For the record, one more time, I love my father and my brother,” Bush said Wednesday at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, speaking of his father, President George H.W. Bush, and elder brother, President George W. Bush. “But I am my own man — and my views are shaped by my own thinking and own experiences.”

“Each president learns from those who came before — their principles, their adjustments,” Bush said. “One thing we know is this: Every president inherits a changing world, and changing circumstances.”

For the record, one more time, I love my father and my brother … But I am my own man — and my views are shaped by my own thinking and own experiences.
JEB BUSH

The foreign policy albatross of his father and brother’s presidencies — which no other candidate has to manage like he does — has dogged Bush’s soon-to-be 2016 campaign. “My views will often be held up in comparison to theirs — and a great fascinating thing in the political world, for some reason, sometimes in contrast to theirs,” Bush quipped Wednesday. But despite that scoff at political press, Bush, in name and substance, remains in the shadow of both his brother’s unpopular foreign policies – particularly the Iraq War — and also his father’s legacy, now nearly 20-years past, including his leadership through the Persian Gulf War.

The Bush wars weigh heavy on the early momentum of Jeb Bush’s candidacy, threatening to undermine an impressive fundraising haul and campaign infrastructure that already froze out his biggest challenge for the nomination, Mitt Romney. As an illustration, Bush’s infrastructure includes a list of 21 advisors — 19 of which served in either his father’s or brother’s administration.

And now the U.S. is more than six months deep into what is promised to be a years-long war in the Middle East, to be inherited by whoever follows Obama into the White House. The war against the Islamic State, or ISIS, and the debate over presidential powers to wage perpetual war in the new age of terrorism present Bush an immediate and important test to explain how he’d do things differently. But he indicated in his wide-ranging address that his response to the rise of the Islamic State wouldn’t differ dramatically from the talking points being trotted out by a full field of GOP presidential contenders. His positions sounded familiar to those employed by Republicans in the last two elections against Obama, in which they relied on a retread of generic “stronger on defense” rhetoric but struggled to distinguish their policies from the Democrat’s.

Tighten the noose, then take them out.
Jeb Bush on the Islamic State

Bush’s answer for how to deal with the Islamic State: “tighten the noose, then take them out,” sounded similar to the current “degrade and destroy” strategy of the Obama administration. “We need to create a coalition led by the United States but in total concert with the neighborhood,” he said. “There’s an attitude in the neighborhood that we’re gonna cut and run. This is a huge challenge for the president. Part of it is his own making, part of it is these trends that have existed for a long while.”

But Bush made sure to repeatedly use the phrase “radical Islamic terrorism,” as conservatives have been demanding for weeks. “The more we try and ignore that reality, the less likely it is that we’re going to develop an effective strategy.”

On Iraq, Bush portrayed his brother’s war as a success later undone by Obama. “There were mistakes made in Iraq for sure,” he said, but called the 2006 surge “one of the most heroic acts of courage politically than any president has done.”

“It created a stability that, when the new president came in, [Obama] could’ve built on…. That void has been filled because we created the void.”

There were mistakes made in Iraq for sure.
Jeb Bush

As other potential GOP candidates already have done, Bush called for the U.S. to show greater strength on the global stage. “Everywhere you look you see the world slipping out of control,” Bush said. “The examples keep piling up — President Obama called ISIS the junior varsity four days after they took Fallujah,” Bush said. “He dismissed Russia as merely a regional power.”

“Under this administration, we are inconsistent and indecisive. We have lost the trust and the confidence of our friends. We definitely no longer inspire fear in our enemies.”

On Israel, Bush repeatedly argued that administration officials have fractured the U.S. relationship with Israel through contention with Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu. He called Iran “the defining foreign policy challenge of our time,” and criticized what he called a policy shift in the current nuclear talks to manage the problem, not solve it.

“The great irony of the Obama presidency is this,” he said. “Someone who came to office promising greater engagement with the world has left America less influential in the world.”

“Our words and actions must match so the entire world knows we say what we mean and mean what we say, there should be no gap there,” Bush said. The Obama administration, he said, “draw red lines, then erase them. With grandiosity, they announce resets and disengage. Hashtag campaigns replace actual diplomacy and engagement.”

The great irony of the Obama presidency is this: Someone who came to office promising greater engagement with the world has left America less influential in the world.
Jeb Bush

What Bush called grandiose “resets” and “hashtag campaigns” was a swipe at former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s tenure in the administration.

On defense spending, Bush also sounded like past failed Republican candidates when he said current levels were “dangerous” because they represented “only” 2 percent of GDP – a metric heard in previous presidential campaigns that is rarely used in defense industry circles and frequently derided by budget watchdog groups for not reflecting actual U.S. firepower.

“I believe, fundamentally, that weakness invites war … and strength encourages peace,” Bush said. “America does not have the luxury of withdrawing from the world  … we have no reason to apologize for our leadership, and our interest in serving the cause of global security, global peace and human freedom.”

http://www.defenseone.com/politics/2015/02/jeb-bush-echoes-family-foreign-policy/105582/ 

Image: Pro-Bush Super PAC Spending $10M-Plus on Initial TV Campaign

Pro-Bush Super PAC Spending $10M-Plus on Initial TV Campaign

The powerfully funded super PAC backing Republican Jeb Bush will spend at least $10 million on television time in the earliest voting presidential primary states, the first salvo in a massive TV ad campaign to support the former Florida governor's bid for the Republican nomination.

Officials with Right to Rise USA say they will buy time in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina TV markets and on cable television in the three states. Ads are scheduled to begin in Iowa and New Hampshire on Sept. 15, in South Carolina a week later and then run continuously through the end of the year.

The plan, shared by the group with The Associated Press prior to Monday's buy, is the first evidence of Right to Rise USA's major strategic spending of the roughly $100 million it had on hand last month. It's also the first major move by the group, which was developed by Bush and longtime advisers including California ad maker Mike Murphy, to run alongside Bush's own campaign organization, which is bound by federal fundraising limits.

"We believe Jeb Bush has the strongest record of conservative accomplishments in the race, and we plan to tell that story," Paul Lindsay, communication director for Right to Rise USA, told the AP.

The first ads will be positive spots promoting Bush in a field that includes 16 other major GOP candidates. They will resemble videos on the group's website, promoting Bush and his accomplishments as Florida governor from 1999 to 2007. One such recent piece was taken from clips of Bush from the Aug. 6 Republican debate in Cleveland, Lindsay said.

That does not mean the group's ads won't turn to criticizing Republican rivals once the first contests draw near. The group has already aired one online ad that points to Bush's release of decades of tax returns and publication of thousands of emails sent during his time as governor, to draw comparisons with Democratic front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton, who recently released her private email server under pressure.

To date, the group, based in southern California, has spent roughly $200,000 on online advertising.

The new expenditure, which Lindsay described as an "eight-figure" buy, is significant because it's the first big expense for the group that Bush helped raise more than $103 million to finance, and which is expected to perform other campaign functions in support of the former governor.

Under Federal Election Commission rules, Bush, having declared his candidacy on June 15, is now forbidden as a candidate from directly soliciting money for the group or advising how to spend it. However, Bush worked with Murphy and senior campaign aides Sally Bradshaw and David Kochel on a long-term strategy where the super PAC would complement the campaign, which is bound by fundraising restrictions the super PACs are not.

The idea of a parallel outside group — it can raise unlimited sums from individuals, corporations and groups — is not new. Mitt Romney, the 2012 GOP nominee, attempted it later in his campaign. And other GOP candidates for the 2016 GOP nomination have formed super PACs and have begun buying advertising time in early states.

However, none has combined the planning strategy with the sums of money Bush's super PAC has been able to raise, making it a pioneering effort in the super PAC era of presidential campaigning.

In June, the group announced it had met its ambitious goal of raising more than $100 million, taking full advantage of the nation's evolving campaign finance laws to collect $103 million over the first six months of 2015. In June, the group had a balance of $98 million.

 http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/jeb-bush-super-pac-10/2015/08/16/id/670311/?ns_mail_uid=80841506&ns_mail_job=1632116_08162015&s=al&dkt_nbr=lyqvrqhp